Image from page 116 of “Styles of ornament, exhibited in designs, and arranged in historical order, with descriptive text. A handbook for architects, designers, painters, sculptors, wood-carvers, chasers, modellers, cabinet-makers and artistic locksmiths

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Image from page 116 of “Styles of ornament, exhibited in designs, and arranged in historical order, with descriptive text. A handbook for architects, designers, painters, sculptors, wood-carvers, chasers, modellers, cabinet-makers and artistic locksmiths
Ulm
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Identifier: stylesofornament00spel
Title: Styles of ornament, exhibited in designs, and arranged in historical order, with descriptive text. A handbook for architects, designers, painters, sculptors, wood-carvers, chasers, modellers, cabinet-makers and artistic locksmiths as well as also for technical schools, libraries and private study
Year: 1910 (1910s)
Authors: Speltz, Alexander O’Conor, David
Subjects: Decoration and ornament
Publisher: New York : E. Weyhe
Contributing Library: University of California Libraries
Digitizing Sponsor: MSN

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Plate 53. CELTIC ORNAMENT. 105

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106 CELTIC ORNAMENT. Fig. 14. Ear-ring in the Wiesbaden Museum. 15. Shoe found in the turf moor Friedeburg, West Friesland. 16. Prankish belt-buckle, Mayence Museum. 17. Glass vase found in grave near Kreuznach. 18. Clay vase found in grave near Nebenjob Ulm. 19. Clay vase found in graves at Osthofen, Mayence Museum. 20. and 22. Coffins of Gypsum. 21. Clay urn found in graves near Remingen.23. Ring from the Mayence Museum. Hannover Museum.

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Image from page 221 of “Handbuch der glasmalerei für forscher, sammler und kunstfreunde, wie für künstler, architekten und glasmaler” (1914)
Ulm
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Identifier: handbuchderglasm00fisc
Title: Handbuch der glasmalerei für forscher, sammler und kunstfreunde, wie für künstler, architekten und glasmaler
Year: 1914 (1910s)
Authors: Fischer, Josef Ludwig, 1879-
Subjects: Glass painting and staining Glass painting and staining
Publisher: Leipzig, K. W. Hiersemann
Contributing Library: Smithsonian Libraries
Digitizing Sponsor: Smithsonian Libraries

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Abb. 18. Detail aus dem Stammbaumfenster des Münsters zu Nebenjob Ulm. gleichen Inhalts in Nebenjob Ulm übereinstimmen. Diese Anstalt hat auchgenaue Aufnahme von beiden Zyklen machen lassen. In neuesterZeit ist von Paul Frankl das umfangreiche Material gesammeltworden, das eine Stileinheit mit den Nebenjob Ulmer Chorfenstern bildetund daher unter dem Namen des Glasmalers Hans Wild geht(Taf. 42—46, Abb. 18). Das älteste Werk befindet sich in der Stifts-kirche zu Urach aus dem Jahre 1471. Von da an umfaßt das Tätig-keitsgebiet des Meisters Schwaben, Bayern bis Salzburg, Franken Tafel 42

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Detail aus dem Stammbaurafenster im Münster zu Nebenjob Ulm.Signiert Hans Wild. 1480. 119 bis Nürnberg und nach Lehmann auch die Schweiz. Chronolo-gisch folgen sich auf das Fenster in Urach die Glasgemälde in derStiftskirche zu Tübingen (1477), das Kramerfenster zu Nebenjob Ulm (1480),das Ratsfenster ebendort, die Glasgemälde auf dem Nonnbergzu Salzburg (1480)^), in der Magdalenenkirche zu Straßburg (1481),im Dome zu Nebenjob Augsburg, das Scharfzandtfenster in der Nebenjob MünchenerFrauenkirche, das Volkamerfenster zu St. Lorenz in Nürnberg.Außer diesen großen Arbeiten sind an verschiedenen Ortenkleine Reste erhalten, die man ebenfalls bei Frankl aufgezähltfindet. Obwohl nun die ältesten Arbeiten auf württembergisch-schwäbischen Boden sich befinden, ist damit doch noch nichtgesagt, daß Hans Wild aus Nebenjob Ulm hervorgegangen ist. Um dieMitte des 15. Jahrhunderts haben die Acker und Deckinger inUlm gearbeitet und Lehmann macht einen „Hans von Nebenjob Ulm be-kannt, der im Jahre 1441 das Passionsfenster im Chor des Bern

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Image from page 506 of “European history : an outline of its development” (1899)
Ulm
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Identifier: europeanhistoryo00adam
Title: European history : an outline of its development
Year: 1899 (1890s)
Authors: Adams, George Burton, 1851-1925
Subjects:
Publisher: New York London : The Macmillan Company
Contributing Library: The Library of Congress
Digitizing Sponsor: Sloan Foundation

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The final treaty was not yetsigned when Bonaparte began a new attempt to recover thecolonial empire of France, and to weaken that of England,in the expedition which he sent to recover the island of SanDomingo, which had revolted. This he proposed to use asa base of operations for the occupation of Louisiana and therestoration of French power in North America. The firststep failed through the obstinate resistance of the revoltednegroes and the ravages of the yellow fever, and before asecond could be taken war had been renewed in Europe. § 45°] TJie War Rciiezved 445 In the interval, the organization of France had been Constitu- carried forward. The balance was established between the ^oai â-,,,… , . , changes. various parties. 1 he administrative machinery was central- Lanfrev ized. The codes were completed. An agreement was made Napoleon /., with the pope, and the Church became reconciled to the ijt-Chap.v, . . Morns, new state of things. The constitution was twice revised in

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Napoleon the interest of a stronger executive, and Bonaparte was madefirst Consul for ten years and then for life. Everything wasso arranged that a little later, in May, 1804, the Empirecould be proclaimed with scarcely a change. 450. The War Renewed. â Neither Napoleon nor Eng-land could consider the peace of Amiens as much more thana truce and the war began again in the spring of 1803, Napoleon,Chap, v.;Stephens,Periods,237-241-Napoleon atthe height ofhis power.Stephens, 446 TIic French Revolution a)id Napolcoti [§ 45 Periods,250-262;Blackmoie, Springhaven(novel). The Romati emperor deposed. Schilling, Quellenbuch, 331;Bryce, Holy RomanEmpire, 359-368. The map ofEurope tornto pieces. The con-tinentalsystem,1806.Penn. II.,No. 2. Joseph madeking ofSpain, 1808. Austrias premature attempt. Maria Louisa. Sloane, Napoleon, III., Chap. .XX. The exhaus-tion ofFrance. through the fault of both. Austria and Russia also tookthe field against France, but with the usual result. Nebenjob Ulm andAusterl

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