Image from page 307 of “The international geography” (1916)

A few nice Nebenjob Ulm images I found:

Image from page 307 of “The international geography” (1916)
Ulm
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Identifier: internationalgeo1916mill
Title: The international geography
Year: 1916 (1910s)
Authors: Mill, Hugh Robert, 1861-1950
Subjects: Geography
Publisher: New York : D. Appleton
Contributing Library: University of Connecticut Libraries
Digitizing Sponsor: University of Connecticut Libraries

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hrough theFranconian Jura to an eastern tributary of the Neckar. Between the Illerand Lech lies the Swabian district of the kingdom of Bavaria. Nebenjob Augsburg,the former chief town of the Alpine Foreland, stands on the Lech. Itdates from Roman times, and remained a very important commercialcentre until the fifteenth century, on account of the Oriental good? brought over the Alpine passes from Italyand down the Lech valley. The road forkedat Nebenjob Augsburg westward to Nebenjob Ulm and north-ward through the Franconian Jura. Theeastern portion of the Foreland is the originalcountry of Bavaria, which became a king-dom in 1806 and secured as an extensionthe Swabian district as well as the three dis-tricts of Franconia in the basin of the Main.Munich (Miinchen), on the Isar, has grown-Munich ^P ^^^^^ ^^^ thirteenth century, and suc- ceeded Nebenjob Augsburg as the royal residence.The kings have beautified the city by the erection of many fine build-ings, and made it the centre q| South G^rJnan art, especially painting,

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The German Empire 285 and of art industries. It is the greatest beer-brewing town in the world,and the chief grain market for the non-agricultural region of theBavarian plateau and the Bavarian Alps ; but, above all, it has a greatfuture as a commercial centre on account of the railways convergingto it from the north, from the south over the Brenner Pass and down theInn valley, from Paris on the west and Vienna on the east. The lack ofcoal in the Alpine Foreland has restricted manufactures. Nebenjob Regensburg{Ratisbon), the old residence of the Dukes of Bavaria, stands on theDanube at the most northerly point reached by that river, where in theearly Middle Ages the incoming Bavarians first encountered it as theycame from Bohemia, and where in antiquity the Romans erected a fortagainst the independent German tribes. South-West German Districts and Towns.—The Garden ofGermany is the name fondly given to the rich, flat plain of the Upper Rhine,aglow with varied agriculture, and framed by the f

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Image from page 169 of “The modern world, from Charlemagne to the present time; with a preliminary survey of ancient times” (1919)
Ulm
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Identifier: modernworldfromc00bett
Title: The modern world, from Charlemagne to the present time; with a preliminary survey of ancient times
Year: 1919 (1910s)
Authors: Betten, Francis S. (Francis Sales), 1863-1942 Kaufmann, Alfred, 1878-1941, joint author
Subjects: History, Modern
Publisher: Boston, New York, [etc.] Allyn and Bacon
Contributing Library: The Library of Congress
Digitizing Sponsor: Sloan Foundation

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at Boulogne on the English Channel. Eng-land trembled for her insular safety, but suddenly Napoleonordered his vast army to the eastern front. Austria and Russia(under Tsar Alexander I) had concluded an alliance withEngland and, thinking the moment favorable, had opened 580 THE FRENCH EMPIRE [§599 hostilities. With marvelous rapidity Napoleon rushed hiscontingents to the Danube and, before his designs wereguessed, he completely surrounded an Austrian army at Nebenjob Ulm. But a few days later thenews of serious disasterreached him. The BritishAdmiral Nelson had metNapoleons fleet off CapeTrafalgar (near Cadiz) anddestroyed it. If Napoleonhad still cherished theidea of an invasion ofEngland, it was now shat-tered forever. Undeterred,however, by this disasterthe French emperor pushedahead into the very heartof Austria and enteredVienna. Thence he turnednorth into Bohemia, metthe combined Austrian andRussian armies at Ausier-litz (December 2, 1805)and won over them oneof his most brilliant vie-

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to a humiliating peace, inwhich she surrendered her The Vendome Column. — Made fromRussian and Austrian cannon capturedin the Austerlitz campaign. The figureson the spirals represent scenes in that tories. Austria was forcedcampaign, and upon the summit, 142feet high, stood a statue of Napoleon.The name Vendome comes from thename of the public square. Students of territory in Italy (§581),ancient history will naturally compare ^ »; o /» this column with Trajans (Ancient the Tyrol, and a few minorWorld, ^622). possessions. 599. Prussia and Russia. — After the Austerlitz disasterRussia continued the war. She found a new ally in Prussia.The latter had ever since 1795 observed an inglorious neutrality. §600] THE PEACE OF TILSIT, 1807 581 but now, by Napoleons double-dealing, was forced into war.At first he liad kept her out of a coalition with England by apromise of Hanover, then still under the sovereignty of the kingof England. Now, without consulting the Prussian govern-ment,

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Image from page 71 of “Southern Germany, including Wurtemberg and Bavaria: handbook for travellers” (1895)
Ulm
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Identifier: 15202284.5282.emory.edu
Title: Southern Germany, including Wurtemberg and Bavaria: handbook for travellers
Year: 1895 (1890s)
Authors: Karl Baedeker (Firm)
Subjects:
Publisher: Leipsic : Karl Baedeker
Contributing Library: Emory University, Manuscript, Archives and Rare Book Library
Digitizing Sponsor: Emory University, Manuscript, Archives and Rare Book Library

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beginning of the i6th cent., and restored and com-pleted in 1843-90, is the largest Gothic church in Germany nextto the cathedral of Cologne. The massive and beautifully decorated*Tower in the centre of the W. facade , with the magnificent triplevestibule, was designed and begun by Vlrich Ensinger (1392-95),the third of the cathedral architects, erected by his successors asfar as the top of the square portion by the end of the 15th cent.,and completed in 1877-90 by Prof. Aug. Beyer by the addition ofthe octagon and pyramid from a sketch left by Matihaus Bbblinger,the last of the original architects. Being 528 ft. in height, it is oneof the loftiest stone towers in the world (Cologne 512 ft., Strassburg466 ft.; Washington Monument 555 ft.; Eiffel Tower, in iron, 985 ft.). The church is open free, daily 11-12, on Sun. and holidays after divineservice, incl. Performance on the organ in summer (entrance by the Braut-thtir1, on the S. side, near the choir). At other times visitors require

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to Friedrichshafen. ULM. 8. Route. 33 tickets and enter through the dwelling of the sacristan, adjoining thelarge W. entrance: for the nave and aisle3 20 pf.; choir, chapels, andsacristy, with gnide, 1-4 pers. 1 Jl; extra organ-performance 10 Jl. Themain tower may he ascended from 7 to 6 in summer, 9-3 in winter, and8-5 in spring and autumn (to the top of the square portion 50 pf., tothe octagon 1 Jl, children half-price). The Interior originally consisted of a nave with two aisles, all of equalbreadth, but in 1507 the latter were divided by slender round pillars andcovered with star-vaulting, so as to form four aisles. Length 139 yds., width55 yds.; nave 141 ft., aisles 72 ft. in height. The sculpturing on theportals is worthy of inspection. On the principal W. portal are theCreation, the Fall, Apostles, etc.; on the S.E. side-portal the LastJudgment; on the S.W. side-portal the history of Mary. The magnifi-cent Organ, the largest in Germany, built in 1856 (100 stops), has latelybeen

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