Image from page 67 of “Augsburg’s drawing, book 2” (1901)

A few nice Nebenjob Augsburg images I found:

Image from page 67 of “Augsburg’s drawing, book 2” (1901)
Augsburg
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Identifier: augsburgsdrawing02augs
Title: Augsburg’s drawing, book 2
Year: 1901 (1900s)
Authors: Augsburg, De Resco Leo, b. 1859
Subjects: Drawing
Publisher: Boston, New York, Educational Pub. Co
Contributing Library: Internet Archive
Digitizing Sponsor: Internet Archive

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Text Appearing Before Image:
xlj Ue.s BVacV Wwe.; at—esata^wnmiiiriii itiiin>irin«-iiii.rii-fiirii.i.i.i i,-— . ■■ ■ I II ■iiiimtiww—BBiaBBB^ I Gt(xUfe^ we,s „sa«c._^ —^- ?^;!2^^5^<—~ The thought, the idea, is everything, ihe line nothing; soinstead of looking to the lino as a source of power, we should lookentirely to the thought back of the line. In general we may divide the lines made with pencil orcrayon into : Gnn/ lines, varying from tine to ])road gray. Black lines, varying from tine to broad black. 64 AUGSBURGS DRAWING. Graded lines, lines ffraded from light to heavy and fromheavy to light. Grxissy lines, which are irregular lines in which the verticalpredominates. Broken lines, which are irregular lines to represent irregularsurfaces. They may be as variable as the surfaces which theyrepresent. Every drawing sJioidd he represented triflt a variety of line —ivith lines varying from ligltf to black, from fne gray to hroad gray.The full range of the pencil should be used.

Text Appearing After Image:
Fig. 12 is a bridge drawn with the top on a level with theeye. All the different kinds of lines are represented in this draw-ins. In oreneral, the under lines are heavy and l)lack, and the toplines light. Observe how the different surfaces are suggested, thevariety of line, and how the material of which the bridge is com-posed is suggested by the kind of line. AUGSBURGS DRAWING. 65 DRILL EXERCISES. 1. Draw Fig. 12. 2. Draw Fig. 12 with the center of vision at X. 3. Draw Fig. 12 with the center of vision at O. The direction of a line is of more A^ahie than its quality. Ifthe direction is wrong, the line is wrong, no matter how nicely itmay be drawn. The direction of the line xii<igefitfi the direction of the surface;the hind of line, the qucdity of the surface. For example, a verticalline suggests a vertical surface; a horizontal line a horizontalsurface; an oblique line an oblique surface; a curved line ucurved surface, and a receding line a receding surface. A horizontiil straight

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Please note that these images are extracted from scanned page images that may have been digitally enhanced for readability – coloration and appearance of these illustrations may not perfectly resemble the original work.

Image from page 78 of “Augsburg’s drawing, book 2” (1901)
Augsburg
Image by Internet Archive Book Images
Identifier: augsburgsdrawing02augs
Title: Augsburg’s drawing, book 2
Year: 1901 (1900s)
Authors: Augsburg, De Resco Leo, b. 1859
Subjects: Drawing
Publisher: Boston, New York, Educational Pub. Co
Contributing Library: Internet Archive
Digitizing Sponsor: Internet Archive

View Book Page: Book Viewer
About This Book: Catalog Entry
View All Images: All Images From Book

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Text Appearing Before Image:
ment. (3) .Their use is not practical,satisfactory or necessary. But while the above is true, a knowledge of these points is ofgreat aid to the judgment in determining the direction of lines andsurfaces. Box A is said to be drawn in parallel perspective and Box B inangular perspective. Lines and Models.— Place before you a common pasteboardbox in the position of Fig. 2 and observe the three sets of lines1, 1,1,1; 2, 2, 2, 2 ; 3, 3, 3, 3. The first set are vertical and AUGSBURGS DRAWING. 75 parallel. The sets marked 2, 2, 2, 2, and 3, 3, 3, 3, are receding,and consequently converge slightly, hut in the drmving they shouldnot appear to converge^ but should appear parallel — thei/ shouldappear natural. Draw all objects with light lines and then finish with heavier.Draw the receding lines longer than the edge of the object so as tojudge more accurately of their correctness. Use the model to verify, to correct and to perfect the mindimage. A common pasteboard box is an excellent model.

Text Appearing After Image:
Shading.— Shading may be used in connection Avith thiswork providing it is used as a means of expression— as a meansof bringing out the idea and making it plain. It is the office ofshading to help the weak — the weak side of the idea. In theseproblems those faces may he regarded as iveak that are representedhy less than four lines. The surface on which the object rests,having no lines to represent it, may be regarded as weak. In Fig. 3, face A is represented by four lines, therefore needsno shade to strengthen it. Face B is represented by only twolines, hence is regarded as weak and is shaded. Faces C and Dare weak where they are covered by face A, hence arestrengthened with shade lines at these points. This is merelysuggestive and is not intended to limit the use of shade on ^irongfaces, if there is reason to place it there. 76 AUGSBURGS DRAWING.

Note About Images
Please note that these images are extracted from scanned page images that may have been digitally enhanced for readability – coloration and appearance of these illustrations may not perfectly resemble the original work.

Image from page 68 of “Augsburg’s drawing, book 2” (1901)
Augsburg
Image by Internet Archive Book Images
Identifier: augsburgsdrawing02augs
Title: Augsburg’s drawing, book 2
Year: 1901 (1900s)
Authors: Augsburg, De Resco Leo, b. 1859
Subjects: Drawing
Publisher: Boston, New York, Educational Pub. Co
Contributing Library: Internet Archive
Digitizing Sponsor: Internet Archive

View Book Page: Book Viewer
About This Book: Catalog Entry
View All Images: All Images From Book

Click here to view book online to see this illustration in context in a browseable online version of this book.

Text Appearing Before Image:
l)lack, and the toplines light. Observe how the different surfaces are suggested, thevariety of line, and how the material of which the bridge is com-posed is suggested by the kind of line. AUGSBURGS DRAWING. 65 DRILL EXERCISES. 1. Draw Fig. 12. 2. Draw Fig. 12 with the center of vision at X. 3. Draw Fig. 12 with the center of vision at O. The direction of a line is of more A^ahie than its quality. Ifthe direction is wrong, the line is wrong, no matter how nicely itmay be drawn. The direction of the line xii<igefitfi the direction of the surface;the hind of line, the qucdity of the surface. For example, a verticalline suggests a vertical surface; a horizontal line a horizontalsurface; an oblique line an oblique surface; a curved line ucurved surface, and a receding line a receding surface. A horizontiil straight line indicates a horizontal fat surface;a horizontal grass// line indicates a horizontal grassy surface; ahorizontal broken line indicates a horizontal broken surface, etc.

Text Appearing After Image:
I 3, 1^ C In Fig. 13 the lines between the receding lines, A and B, arebroken vertical lines, and they indicate a ])roken vertical surface.The lines between B and C are broken oblique, and they suggest abroken oblique surface ; between C and D, horizontal receding, and 66 AUGSBURGS DRAWING. they suggest a horizontal receding surface ; between D and E,grassy oblique, and they suggest an oblique grassy surface ; be-tween E and F, grassy horizontal, and between F and G, verticaland grassy horizontal, and vertical surfaces are suggested. The horizontal lines at the base of the trees in the distancesuofgest a horizontal surface. The oblique line at the base of the tree on the left suggests anoblique surface. Observe the above ideas on real objects. JJie representation ofideas will do little good if the ideas themselves cannot be seen outsideof the picture in which they are represented. 4. Draw Fig. 13. 5. Draw the fence in Fig. 13, and represent it as leaning tothe right, as if partly blow

Note About Images
Please note that these images are extracted from scanned page images that may have been digitally enhanced for readability – coloration and appearance of these illustrations may not perfectly resemble the original work.

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